Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Eschfeld, Germany: the St. Luzia Parish Church


Did I mention that Astrid and I drove to the Luxembourg area (country and city) 2 weekends ago for a 4-day long weekend?  I didn't think so.

It was 1000 km (621 miles) of "short of eyes" in four different countries:  the Netherlands, Germany, Luxembourg and Belgium.  But not to worry because I'll be giving you the trip in bits-n-pieces.  Easier to swallow...and in no particular order.

Let's start with a teeny-tiny town on the western border of Germany, before entering Belgium (on our way home, actually).  When I say teeny-tiny, I mean all of about 200 people!  Eschfeld.

We stopped there because of the St. Luzia Parish Church, which we had seen in a travel brochure at our B&B.  OMG.  Did we ever hit the jackpot!

 It was built in 1869 and can be seen for "riles and riles amound."

And this is its treasure!
Christoph März was the painter-pastor who created these paintings between 1906-21.
If you didn't know how to read, you could tell the Bible stories from their pictures.

How can you not be short of eyes!

Everywhere you look there is another painting, another story.
Oh, and all the popes up till then, as well as pastors of the church!

I found my   there...and isn't that Jeanne d'Arc?


There's even his signature from 1916:  Ghr. März.
And, yes, we signed the guest book, with generous praise...especially for keeping the doors unlocked.
We were there on a Tuesday morning.

We love the cemeteries outside these wee churches.
One section was for the WWII soldiers...even the unknown ones.
"Blessed Mary, Mother of God."  I can hear all the prayers.

Speaking of Mother Mary...just 2 km from the church was this roadside chapel/shrine.

Astrid gives you some scale.

Big enough for two chairs and an altar...and candles for prayers.
Such roadside chapels are all over parts of Europe with heavy Roman Catholic presence.
You'll be seeing more in the days to come....

16 comments:

  1. wow, jackpot indeed. incredible interiors. very impressive.

    now you have to tell us the backstory on "riles and riles". it's not like the japanese who can't pronounce the r sound so they say replace the r sounds with l, is it?

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    1. LOL, Maria. My ex-husband was known for his spoonerisms and especially loved reciting the "Cinderella" story, full of wonderful spoonerisms, like "miles and miles around"= "riles and riles amound." I guess you had to be there. It's also where you get "she slopped her dripper!" :)

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  2. ps. it's the other way around...it's the l sounds they can't pronounce so they replace it with r sound. my bad!

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    1. But I knew exactly what you meant, Maria. :)

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  3. You get to do all that small scale micro-exploring to find the things we tourists always miss.

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    1. It helps to have a car and to live so close, Ted. It took us about 4 hours to get to Trier, Germany, from home...just 60 km north of Luxembourg City. We are very lucky to be in this part of the world!

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  4. Things we find on our way in the middle of no-where going from some-where to any-where.
    That church was a miracle on its own. We were lucky to have that flyer with 'things to see'.
    Ted is right, we are so lucky to have these small scale exploring. Thank God for the GPS 'TomTom'. It always takes us back into the world of the living.
    Great post, with wonderful collages. Short of eyes, for four days.

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    1. "...in the middle of no-where going from some-where to any-where." I love that, MLMA! It's so true. And with our Tom-Tom, we never really get lost. Our photo hunts never disappoint. We really are very lucky!

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  5. Such amazing detail. You wonder what it would cost to do that today! Love that you two take in the country!

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    1. I know, Robin. Would anyone even TRY to do such a thing in this day and age??? We do love where we live and feel so lucky to have access to so much! It'll take the rest of lives to see even the tip of the iceberg!

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  6. What a gem, Ginnie!!! Although it is a rather young church (1869), it looks "old" if you know what I mean. The inside is breath taking, but I also love its simple outside look. Quite amazing such a big church for such a small community. Beautiful pictures - my favorites are the one in the cemetery.

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    1. This is a good example of how you can't tell a book by its cover, Carola. It also reminds me of all the "plain Janes" around who are absolutely gorgeous on the inside. We have lots of lessons to learn from this gem! Thank you.

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  7. Wow! I was not prepared for the inside of that church ... just amazing. And I love the chapel & shrine, too. Thanks for including us on another great trip.

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    1. I know, Susan. And the thing is, I wonder how many people have no clue it's even there! Both of them! Thanks for joining the ride. :)

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  8. Looks like lots of fun and exploring.. Love the little chapel at the end.

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    1. You'd love every minute of these photo hunts, Jen, I know. One day....

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