Wednesday, July 16, 2014

St. Mary Redcliffe Parish Church, Bristol, England


As promised, here we are at the end of our England 2014 trip, after 10 full and glorious days in May.  Besides a meet-up of 21 photobloggers, we spent overnights with 3 separate couples, all of which I've told you about already.

Today, I close this Great Adventure with the St. Mary Redcliffe parish church in Bristol, England.  For how much we both love churches, both large and small, it seems appropriate to finish here.

For one thing, you can't miss it with it's 292-ft spire!
It's apparently the 3rd tallest of all England's parish churches.

Built from the 12th-15th centuries, it's been a place of worship for 800 years.
Queen Elizabeth I said it was "the fairest, goodliest, and most famous parish church in England."
Thankfully, it narrowly escaped destruction from bombs in WWII.

 When you can spend a lot of time in the entrance alone, that tells you something.

In fact, it tells you a lot!

As you know, I always head straightaway to the nave.

Then I look up to the windows and the ceiling.

And then down to the floors.  I'm never disappointed.
Always look up; always look down...and see what you catch in between.

I told you I've started collecting church cushions.  This is why.

The altar, the choir, the brass lecterns...all of it.
But this time I totally missed the pulpit and the organ.  How did that happen?!

Maybe it was because I got caught up in the Chaotic Pendulum!

I watch this and stare every time.  Who thinks these things up?
(too bad the sun was so bright)

"Through Journey into Science, we offer a forum for the whole community to come together to discuss, wonder at, question and think about the issues advances in science and technology are raising for our world."

Amen.  Selah.  So be it.

♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

We can hardly wait to go back to England again, hopefully two years from now, if not sooner.
(Next year we already have two sets of people coming to see us here in Dutchland.)

Thanks to all who made this another trip of a lifetime.  You know who you are!
And thanks to all of you who have come along for the ride.

18 comments:

  1. This is an amazing Church. There is so much to see and a lot of art work done by the creators.
    The water pendulum is a fascinating object. I never saw something of it kind.
    Great pictures, love all the different kind of pillows on the chairs.
    Indeed, a thank you to all that made this trip possible and showed us around with great joy.
    'we'll be back.....

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    1. I couldn't have said it better, MLMA! Thanks for being my Partner in Crime. :)

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  2. I was going to say how fortunate that bombs missed it during the war years. How fabulous this is!!!!

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    1. I love that they have the marker out in the yard to show how close the tramline came to the church, Maria. They were very lucky.

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  3. It looks like a fabulous church :-)

    I have another Cathedral in an ancient town lined up for later this year ;-)

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    1. Little by little, Cherry, between you and us, we might hit them all. :)

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  4. Wonderful details you did capture in this really beautiful church. I enjoyed your collage very much. It's a pity I didn't see the chaotic pendulum, but I saw some newly cleaned medieval windows you couldn't see because they were in restauro. Heel bedankt, Ginnie, for this diary full of wonderful photos and descriptions!

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    1. I think I missed a lot inside this church, Philine (like the organ and pulpit), even though I think we spent a lot of time there. I'm glad I could show you the pendulum, since you missed it!

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  5. How fortunate that you two have found such a wonderful group of people!

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    1. Oh, yes, Robin. The Shutterchance blogger site is small enough that we have developed quite a nice community, most of whom are from England, where the site originates. We feel very, very lucky. Trust me!

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  6. Did I miss something? There was a space where I think the last image should be, and all the images came in slowly. Hmmm! Another great old church that we missed. This one looked like a special beauty. Nothing for it but to go back.

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    1. In the email notice, Ted, the Vimeo of the chaotic pendulum was missing. (Don't ask me why.) But it's still here and worth the watching/staring. It's quite something. And yes, I would go back if I had the chance. There was so much I didn't see.

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    2. An interesting device and work of art! Thanks for making sure I didn’t miss it. Do they record to see if it favors one side or the other over time?

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    3. I have no clue, Ted, but good question. All I know is that it’s “chaotic.” No one can predict what it will do.

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  7. What an amazing pendulum!

    BTW did you know that the cushions are called hassocks? We also used to call them "kneelers"

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    1. I knew you'd like that pendulum, Anne...right up your alley. :)

      But NO, I did not know those cushions are called hassocks...even though that word does sound familiar. I didn't put the two together. So THANKS. :)

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  8. Fabulous. I really don't know how there can be such a church, and I don't even know about it. Just gorgeous. The stone work is mesmerizing. I love how the gold of the ceiling makes it seem that light is coming in from on high. That chaotic pendulum is so cool, and the journey into science community forum is brilliant.

    And you, all that you collect and study in these churches gives new meaning to "church scholar." :)

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    1. LOL, Ruth, because "church scholar" I most definitely am NOT. You should hang around Lisl and Chris for awhile to see and hear all they know about these churches. It blows the mind. Astrid and I feel very lucky to have these trips where we can learn from them!

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