Monday, September 08, 2014

The Muiderslot Castle in Muiden, NL


Back to finish up Astrid's birthday weekend in the Huizen/Muiden neck of the woods, this is the castle she wanted me to see from her childhood.  She could hardly wait to go back to see it herself, just 20 km away from Hilversum, where she was born and raised.

I, too, was excited when we first spotted it from afar.
That's a castle...considered the best-kept and most beautiful Medieval castle in the Netherlands!

 It even has it's own weathervanes, of course (bottom 3 images).
Everything else we saw as we walked from our car, along the harbor.

And yes, we got to use our museum card for this.
Can you imagine having an inner courtyard like this for your humble abode?

 Lucky for us, a half-hour tour came free with the ticket.

Do you think it'd be fun to live during that day and age?
The castle was built in 1285.

The tour was totally worth it.  It's all in the details, you know.

Then we went off on our own to the tower and checked out the view from there.
That body of water is the IJsselmeer, Western Europe's largest lake (fresh water).

As we explored the castle, I started thinking about living there.
HA!  And playing hide-n-seek.

Kids of all ages have so much to see and do there.

And this is just a smattering.

What would YOU be tempted to buy?
We bought a white stone bottle of the Tesseltje Likorette, since we collect stone bottles.
It's made on Texel Island and is sold only there...and at this castle!

Once we were done inside, we went out and walked around the castle to see all sides.

 Remember my oculus?  I couldn't resist.

Couldn't resist the plum trees outside the castle moat, either, with no Do Not Touch signs.
Astrid grabbed 2 each as a nice little appetizer for our walk into town for lunch.

 Have I mentioned how much I love the Dutch harbor towns?!
Even on a rainy, overcast day!

Astrid had already picked out where would eat:  the Ome Ko Café just outside the harbor lock.
It's a brown cafe that is part of her young-20's years growing up.

After the huge breakfast we had had at the Fletcher Hotel that morning (this post), 
the panini-tosti lunch was exactly what the doctor ordered.  We always share, you know.

It was the perfect way to say Good-Bye to a BIG 6-0 birthday celebration weekend.
Lots of memories for Astrid to share with me from her former neck of the woods.
It was as though it were my birthday!

13 comments:

  1. The moment we walked into the courtyard of the castle, my thoughts went back many years. I used to come here with my parents and brother, and we came by bus. No car yet for us. I have been back many times near the castle, but going in was at least over 40 years ago.
    As a kid I loved all the armor for the knights, I had a lot of imagination in that time (still have BTW)
    Thank you for these wonderful pictures, a great memory added. Eating at Ome Ko was fun, the biljart table was gone, no more dancing on top (grin)....
    A great weekend to celebrate the big 6-0......

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    1. Once again, it felt like it was MY birthday, MLMA, instead of yours. I can't begin to tell you how much I enjoyed seeing the sights and memories of your childhood. I truly am "short of eyes" during such times. THANK YOU.

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  2. What a fabulous birthday for the big one! Great photos and I especially loved the "kids" section! :)

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    1. We both were kids that entire birthday weekend, Robin. And as so often happens, I think about how much you and others who've visited us here would love to see such a place!

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  3. One of your loveliest blog posts. The castle looks like it has a princess, and the brick and pewter and the globe and so many glittery things caught in your beautiful compositions! Yes, I think I might have bought that globe or a trip around the harbor in a dinghy.

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    1. So kind of you, Ted! Too bad the globe wasn't for sale but, yes, I can picture you wanting it. That must have been why it caught my eye while we were on the short tour! :)

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  4. wow, this castle has way too many details to occupy the visitor. a perfect day trip destination.

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    1. You and Hubby would love it, Maria. As castles go, it's as good as it gets! :)

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  5. That is one of the most beautiful Medieval castles I have ever seen...and I would have taken a plum too (whispered)...who could resist them.

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    1. You can see why Holland is proud of this one, Donna. I'd actually like to go back for the plums! :D

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  6. This is a perfect castle – just like one imagines in fairy tales but never appears in real life – and there it is! What a fabulous time for the two of you and for a great occasion too. Happy belated birthday to your dear Astrid!

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    1. It's exactly how you'd picture a castle to be, Vagabonde, for sure. And I will definitely relay your birthday wishes to the birthday girl. Thank you.

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  7. I just saw your comment on my blog and I answered, here is my answer in case you don’t come back to read it: “Yes, unfortunately many people, even Parisians, believe that von Choltitz saved Paris because he loved the city. It is false. A French historian said, as late as August 25, 2014, that “For many who know the story of the uprising well, this account is absolute self-serving fantasy.
    “He portrays himself as the saviour of the city,” Lionel Dardenne, from the Museum of Order of the Liberation, which honours resistance fighters, told The Local. “But the truth is he couldn’t have destroyed it.” See http://www.thelocal.fr/20140825/nazi-general-didnt-save-paris-expert Back in 2003 after I read the letter that President Bush introduced as proof that Iraq was buying uranium from Niger I knew it was a false – in French it had grammatical errors and the supposed Niger government official “foreign affairs minister” had been out of office since 1989 – but people believed it too! My Americans friends were upset when I told them I was sure it was a fake letter …Thanks for your comment.”

    Of course now we can find out the truth faster because of the Internet but back in the days of WW2 it was hard to know the truth for sure.

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